Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of the safest medical wonders on the planet. The following link will show you Vitamin C’s success as published in medical literature since the 1940′s.  It has been put down by the FDA and much disbelief exists within the medical community.  Link to article HERE.  However, I and many others have first-handedly enjoyed the nontoxic benefits of sodium ascorbate.  It is important to use high enough doses and the right formulation to achieve best results.

AscorbateWeb

The reason conventional medical doctors are not taught about the mechanisms of action and benefits of vitamin C in medical school, is that if they knew about it, then not only would a raft of other drugs have been unnecessary, but there would not be serious whooping cough or even deaths.  Vitamin A and C would render measles really easy to treat. You’d never see meningococcal complications, because all people suspected of having it, would immediately be put on IV vitamin C and there would be no coagulopathy at all.  Vitamin C antidotes DIC, the coagulopathy.  The ACIP and it’s cronies wouldn’t be able to use meningococcal complications and deaths as emotional blackmail to get people to vaccinate, because people wouldn’t be scared of infections any more.

Are you concerned about vitamin C toxicity?  You shouldn’t be.  History and science has already shown it to be one of the safest interventions. Read about the mythology of vitamin C toxicity, including kidney stones here.

Today, more and more publications in peer-reviewed literature are available.  They show the necessity and benefit of ascorbate to the immune cells called macrophages and neutrophils.  Without vitamin C, the immune system is paralyzed and unable to regenerate the ability to dissolve disease-causing elements in the body.  Vitamin C is also paramount in combating toxin mediated diseases such as whooping cough and tetanus.  HERE is an article I wrote on the science and necessity of vitamin C in whooping cough.

A Preliminary Report on the Use of Cevitamic Acid in the Treatment of Whooping C

 

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